Caring For A Loved One With Alzheimer’s Disease

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“He has given me so much all my life, and now he can only take. Yet his presence now, as always, provides deep comfort to my soul. Now I give to him in every way I can. I realize that my giving to him is a result of his giving to me: emotional support, love, spiritual direction, wisdom, advice, and all that a daughter needs when she is maturing into a young woman.” – A daughter regarding caring for her father with AD.

You may be busy caring for a person with AD and don’t take the time to think about your own emotional wellbeing. But, you need to. Caring for a person with AD takes a lot of time and effort but you also must prioritize your own wellbeing in order to continue to care for your loved one. You may get frustrated and discouraged as some days can be harder than others, these feelings are completely normal and valid. There are a few things you can say to yourself that may help you feel a little better:

  1. I am doing the best I can.
  2. I’m not perfect, 
    and that’s okay.
  3. What I’m doing would be hard for anyone.
  4. I can’t control everything that happens.
  5. I will try to get help from a support group or counselor if caring for my loved ones becomes too much to handle for me.

Click here for more information about Alzheimer’s and dementia-care resources at Arden Place of Grapevine.